Image of Igus Drylin bushings sitting on a Prusa i3 Mk3 printbed

Igus Drylin Bushings: Replacing Bearings on a 3D Printer

My Prusa i3 Mk3 printer’s LM8UU bearings were acting up. It could’ve been an issue with the installation. Or they might’ve just been junk out of the box.

Regardless, it’s time to replace them. With three Igus Drylin bushings in-hand I’ve decided to swap those in on the printer, at least temporarily.

IGUS Drylin install on the Prusa i3 Mk3 3D Printer

Check out the video above. I walk through the process of removing the old bearings and replacing them with the new Igus Drylins. There are also instructions on tightening the Prusa i3 Mk3 heatbed in there.

If you’re not familiar with the Igus Drylin they’re a solid bushing made of iglide J4. And it has lubricant built in the keep everything moving while it ever so slightly wears in. I assume that’s PTFE or an analog but it’s all trademarked product names rather than the types of plastic used.

The model of Igus Drylin busing I’m using is the RJ4JP-01-08 (specifications here). They’re about 12$ for 8 making them a fairly inexpensive alternative to a decent quality LM8UU bearing.

After a week of using the Igus Drylin bushings on the Prusa i3 Mk3 I’m happy with their performance. And they’re still as dead silent as in the video. There’ll be a follow up video and a example print once the bed camera’s up and running.

One thought on “Igus Drylin Bushings: Replacing Bearings on a 3D Printer”

  1. I’m going to create a proper housing for the IGus bushing. I just need to figure out the easiest to use material stiff enough to exert the proper clamping force on the bushing without breaking.

    In the meantime rcaslis on Thingiverse has come out with a fitting to keep the bushings in place on your rods. https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2835381

    Although if you’re not tightening them down hard enough for that already you’re probably not tightening them down enough. They do require quite a bit of clamping force around them to compress and seat.

    This should, though, help spread the force out over the entire bearing which’ll certainly make them work better.

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